Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

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Ultimately, man should not ask what the meaning of his life is, but rather he must recognize that it is he who is asked.-Viktor E. Fankl

After visiting the Holocaust memorial in Berlin, I made an effort to finish this book by Holocaust survivor Viktor E. Frankl. I read it two weeks ago but made a special note to write about it. It’s an easy read that can be finished in one sitting, so I highly recommend it.

It’s the first survivor account that I’ve read about the Holocaust and one that particularly stood out since he was a neurologist and psychiatrist. The first 2/3 of the book is about life in Auschwitz and Dachau and the last 1/3 follows his analysis of the circumstances, along with a brief introduction of logotherapy – a form of existential analysis which he founded post-WW2.  

I found his account of the Holocaust is interesting because you hear him describing the circumstances of the Auschwitz  concentration camps from a psychological  perspective. He talks about the limits of a person’s mental strength, what kept him and his fellow survivors alive and the psychological  differences between those that survived and didn’t. He also talks also about how some fellow prisoners who were given special rights to punish other prisoners were sometimes more brutal than the SS commanders. Truly horrific.

I honestly felt that his book recognised the need of survival in all human beings. No matter who you were, you did whatever you could to not die and sometimes it came as a cost to your moral conscience and to your fellow human beings, but also about the generosity of the human spirit in times of great desperation.

2 main things kept people alive in the camps:

1. The hope to see someone that was beloved to them, be it their children, family, friends .

2. The hope to complete work that could only be done by them. For him, it was a paper that he had brought to Auschwitz that was destroyed by the SS guards. Many a time he took the opportunity to continue to remake notes of his paper and this was the sole thing that kept him going for a few years.

His take on the search for a meaning of life – that it is constantly evolving and differs from man to man, from day to day and from hour to hour. What matters, therefore, is not the meaning of life in general but rather the specific meaning of a person’s life at a given moment.

 

 

The Science of Persuasion

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I started thinking about the power of persuasion after watching The Wolf of Wall Street, based on the true story of former stockbroker Jordan Belfort.

 


Jordan Belfort was convicted of fraud crimes related to stock market manipulation and running a penny stock boiler room. At the point he was arrested, his company Stratton Oakmont employed over 1,000 stock brokers and was involved in stock issues totaling more than $1 billion, including those of Steve Madden’s.

 

Being able to sell is a fascinating skill. While a large part of the show focuses on avarice and the lengths that man will go in order to accumulate wealth, I was honestly impressed with his ability to persuade people to do all kinds of crazy things and rationalize it. His methods in madness did however, encourage a strong company culture, team bonding and cult of personality.

 

This is the real Jordan Belfort speaking at a webinar:

If you watch the show, he’s the guy who introduces Leonardo Dicaprio at the sales workshop. I didn’t finish watching his webinar because I can’t stand the way he talks, but if you have the patience do let me know if this shit works.
As it turns out, there is a science to persuasion.

 

Here are the 6 Key Principles of Influence by Robert Cialdini, based on his book called “The Psychology of Persuasion”.

1. Reciprocity – People tend to return a favor, thus the pervasiveness of free samples in marketing. In his conferences, he often uses the example of Ethiopia providing thousands of dollars in humanitarian aid to Mexico just after the 1985 earthquake, despite Ethiopia suffering from a crippling famine and civil war at the time. Ethiopia had been reciprocating for the diplomatic support Mexico provided when Italy invaded Ethiopia in 1935. The good cop/bad cop strategy is also based on this principle.

2. Commitment and Consistency – If people commit, orally or in writing, to an idea or goal, they are more likely to honor that commitment because of establishing that idea or goal as being congruent with their self-image. Even if the original incentive or motivation is removed after they have already agreed, they will continue to honor the agreement. Cialdini notes Chinese brainwashing on American prisoners of war to rewrite their self-image and gain automatic unenforced compliance.

3. Social Proof – People will do things that they see other people are doing. For example, in one experiment, one or more confederates would look up into the sky; bystanders would then look up into the sky to see what they were seeing. At one point this experiment aborted, as so many people were looking up that they stopped traffic.

4. Authority – People will tend to obey authority figures, even if they are asked to perform objectionable acts. Cialdini cites incidents such as the Milgram experiments in the early 1960s and the My Lai massacre.

5. Liking – People are easily persuaded by other people that they like. Cialdini cites the marketing of Tupperware in what might now be called viral marketing. People were more likely to buy if they liked the person selling it to them. Some of the many biases favoring more attractive people are discussed – also known as the “Halo Effect”.

6. Scarcity – Perceived scarcity will generate demand. For example, saying offers are available for a “limited time only” encourages sales.

 

This animated talk explains it very well.

You can read his paper about ‘Harnessing the Science of Persuasion“.

Bali in Retrospect

Bali – sand, sea, villas and amazing food. What’s not to love?

Our $128USD villa per night. (About $40SGD per person per night)

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Drinks and sunset at Rock Bar.IMG_4302

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Sunrise trek up Mount Batur, an active volcano located at the center of two concentric calderas north west of Mount Agung, Bali, Indonesia.

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Drinks at Potato Head, famous upscale pool / beach side bar in Bali.

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Simon Sinek – Why Leaders Eat Last

Simon Sinek: Why Leaders Eat Last from 99U on Vimeo.

 

Great talk by Simon Sinek on “Why Leaders Eat Last”. He discusses the price of leadership and the social contract we have in place to determine who becomes the alpha and the roles and responsibilities associated with it. Traditionally we’ve created a system where we’re ok that leaders get all the benefits and high salaries, as long as they step in and do the necessary when shit hits the fan.

 

It’s true. Great leaders don’t micro-manage, they make you want to do better so that they’d be proud of you. The only time they step in is to check on you and when you’re struggling. Great leaders give their time and energy, not money.

 

I’m lucky to have seen great leaders in action.

Book Notes: Scott Adams’ How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big

As a Christmas gift to myself I purchased Scott Adams’ “How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big”. Scott Adams is known for his hilarious “Dilbert” comics and his 16 years climbing the corporate ladder in a bank sets the background of the comic.

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What I really enjoyed about this book is how Scott Adams doesn’t see himself as just a cartoonist but as an entrepreneur. While many know him for “Dilbert”, he’s actually tried a dozen over startups and finally got his big break with Dilbert, all the while keeping his full time job at the bank and later, Pacific Bell.

Little facts that you may not have known about him:

  • He is a failed serial entrepreneur. It’s amazing to see how he’s managed to still keep going after so many failed attempts – from grocery delivery, to keypad patents and even a burrito business named “Dilberito”, he’s tried and tested many ideas. Up to now he’s still trying. See his Dilbert file sharing startup:dilbertfilesharing
  • He claims to be a horrible cartoonist but stuck with it, waking up at 4am in the morning to draw Dilbert strips before he managed to leave his job and do it full time.

 

Here are some of the notes I’ve compiled from this book:

1. Deciding VS Wanting

One of the best advice he’s ever gotten – “if you want success, figure out the price, then pay it.” In reality, success has a price and takes a lot of hard work, but most of the time it’s negotiable, depending on the systems you choose.

2. Goals VS Systems

Goal: I want to lose 20kgs by the end of 2014.

System: I will jog everyday for 30mins to keep fit and healthy.

Why choose a system over a goal?

If you achieve a goal, you celebrate and feel terrific, but only until you realise you just lost the thing that gives you purpose and direction. You exist in a state of continuous failure. Systems people succeed every time they choose to apply the system.

3. The Passion Fallacy vs Personal Energy

The reason I was attracted to Scott Adam’s philosophy is because of his “passion fallacy” reasoning. He chooses to believe in managing your personal energy instead of “passion”, which quickly wears out once you hit roadblocks and challenges. Personal energy however, is much more dependable and easy to manage. He goes as far to propose the concept of “the user interface of happiness” as something we can control – especially if we can improve our moods simply by smiling. Once you optimize personal energy, all you need for success is luck.

4. Managing your personal energy

Well, judging by the number of overweight CEOs, I’d say a lot of them would disagree with Scott Adams that exercise and diet is very important to managing your personal energy. But they are. He has a simple, no-willpower, diet system that advocates removing energy draining foods such as white rice, potatoes, desserts and white breads and getting enough sleep so that you don’t crave for unhealthy foods. He also talks about staying active throughout the day by making routines to do simple exercises. He always starts by doing creative work in the morning, followed by breakfast, then errands and exercise in the afternoon and after that, “mindless” activities such as answering meetings and such.

5. The world needs you at your best, so be selfish and take care of yourself

I first heard this piece of advice in the middle of a meeting with my boss, Ziriad. At that point I was working too many weekends (voluntarily) and was bearing the brunt of exhaustion. He, being the awesome boss that he is, comforted me and told me about his own system, which is to make some free time in his calendar to think and strategize instead of filling his schedule with back to back meetings, which can in turn be counter productive. “Your priority 0 is yourself. If you don’t take care of your health and make sure you’re ok, how can you go on to take care of priority 1, 2 or 3?”

When I read it again in Scott Adams’ book, it made me smile. Often times we kind of think that we have to sacrifice EVERYTHING to be successful and we get caught up in peoples’ expectations of us instead of taking care of our health (both mentally and financially). Humans are wired to fulfill our basic needs before thinking about our higher purpose.

Maslows Hierachy of Needs

6. The math of success – every skill you acquire doubles your odds of success

The idea is that you can raise your market value by by merely being good, not extraordinary, at more than one skill. His formula is simply GOOD + GOOD > EXCELLENT.

Unless you’re one of the top performers in the world, you’re better off being good at two skills than great at one. E.g., being a skilled public speaker and knowing your way around PowerPoint should land you a good chance at running your organization.

However, not all skills are equal. Here are some skills that Scott Adams deems as helpful for every adult:

  • Public Speaking
  • Psychology
  • Business Writing
  • Accounting
  • Design
  • Conversation (small talk)
  • Overcoming shyness
  • Second language
  • Golf (and also tennis)
  • Proper Grammar
  • Persuasion
  • Technology (Hobby Level)
  • Proper Voice Techniques

 

Overall, the theme about this book explores his learning from failure. “…always remember that that failure is your friend. It is the raw material of success. Invite it in. Learn from it. And don’t let it leave until you pick its pocket. That’s a system.”

 

Anyone who wants to borrow it just tweet me!

10 lessons from a 100 entrepreneurs

I was recently invited to speak at the reunion of  Salesforce BizAcademy, a 1 week leadership apprenticeship program.

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With students from Salesforce’s BizAcademy 2012 and 2013 Batch! Thanks to Esther from Salesforce, Jael and Ivy from Halogen Foundation Singapore for hosting and inviting me. 

I decided that the topic “10 Lessons I Learnt From 100 Entrepreneurs” would be fitting given the nature of my work.

The tech industry is nothing short of amazing. Across the last 3 years I’ve met some of the most most innovative, generous and intelligent individuals who want to make the world a better place to live in. I’ve probably met more than 100 entrepreneurs but the number is mostly symbolic, the lessons are those that I felt are worth sharing.

 

Here are the notes from my talk :)

10 Lessons from 100 Entrepreneurs

This is a photo of my friend Ellwyn, co-founder of a social enterprise called BagoSphere. BagoSphere trains out–of-school youths to find jobs in Philippines’ booming BPO industry. This is him sitting outside of the classroom in Bago City, talking to his trainees after a blackout. 

It takes a lot of effort to build a sustainable company. It doesn’t stop when you’ve launched a product, nor can you just sit back, relax and watch the money roll in. Keeping up in one of the fastest changing industries and making your product indispensable is the hardest part.

I’ve had entrepreneurs come to me at their lowest and with tears in their eyes, telling me about their fears of not making their families proud, that they totally regret making a wrong decision of taking (or not taking) an investment, that they worry they won’t have enough saved up to pay for their kids’ livelihood or get married. These are very legitimate fears.

Making sure you know why you want to start a company is really important. What can you bring to the industry that you can’t while working for another company? Do you see yourself doing this for another 5 – 10 years? What’s the vision and the end goal?

I highly recommend this talk by Simon Sinek about answering the question of “WHY”. In the hardest of times, the answer will guide you through your actions.

 

 

Slide9

Ben Huh, who is Founder and CEO of Cheezburger didn’t just stumble upon being the owner of the world’s most entertaining websites and then earning shit-loads of money from it.

Equipped with a degree in journalism (uh huh, that’s right, journalism),  his first company was focused on the decidedly unfunny vertical of web analytics, failing after 18 months. He was $40,000 in debt, but quickly got back on his feet. After working a succession of jobs, in 2007 he started blogging, founded I Can Haz Cheezburger, and bought the site.

When faced with the choice to progress up the ladder, working for someone else’s startup – or become the CEO of the world’s weirdest cat sharing site, he chose the latter.

To this day it still baffles his investors why people are fascinated with an image of bacon on a cat, but what matters is that he understood that the internet allows us to be a weird, imperfect and still love each other for it.

In his own words, “it is only failure when you don’t get back on your feet.

Good entrepreneurs will never become who they are without pushing themselves and failing from time to time. It’s tough to put yourself out there and let people criticize your ideas, how you’re executing them and then realize you’ve been building something that no one really wants. In fact, it really sucks, but it seems to be a necessary evil – and we need to be less afraid of failing and be more concerned with learning faster.

Life is never what it’s supposed to be. You can always create all kinds of excuses to stop yourself from doing what you want to do, such as the market being too small, or that there isn’t enough money in Singapore for startups, or that you can’t hire good engineers – but at the end of the day, those are excuses.

 

Slide10
After spending time speaking to  too many wide-eyed entrepreneurs who tell me that they are passionate about this or that , I’ve grown weary of hearing the word passion. I’d much rather listen to what systems they’ve built in place to differentiate themselves in the market, how they’re going to growth into a successful business with limited resources and time.

It’s not that passion isn’t important, I get that, it’s that you have to grow into it sometimes. At the end of the day, we all have responsibilities and people to answer to, so while you chase the dream, also remember that it’s important to put into place the systems that help your company succeed.

Dilbert was just one of Scott Adam’s many pet projects to see if he could earn money writing this comic strip. Turns out, there was product market and eventually he could quite his job at a bank to work on it full time.

Look for that fit.

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Slide11
I once wrote about the 3 types of mentors that you need in your life.

1. Role Model Mentors

Yup, the title is straightforward enough. These are the mentors who you eventually want to be like. The ones you look to and think to yourself, “wow, this is someone I want to be like if I were to be e.g., a manager / activist /mother / whatever I want to besomeday.

2. Peers who are your mentors

“You are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.” – Jim Rohn

Entrepreneurship is tough. If you don’t have a group of friends who are in it together with you or know what you’re going through, go look for those networks! Luckily in Singapore we have lots of meetups and events for you to meet like-minded folks. Trust me, in down times it helps to have friends whom you can turn to to confide in. It matters.

 

3. Mentoring those that are seek mentorship

They say that you only realise how much you really know when you have to teach it. That is true when you find others looking to you to learn something from.  It’s this kind of pay-it-forward mentality that will increase the average collective intelligence of the world.

Slide12
CEO really stands for Chief Everything Officer. Especially if you’re bootstrapping. At the start you’re in charge of everything, regardless of whether its HR, Admin, Product Management, Sales, Tech or Marketing.

Toilet flush spoilt? Learn how to fix it.

Can’t afford a cleaning lady? Learn how to use a broom.

It’s not as glamorous as you’d think and you’re definitely not a “rockstar”.

Read: Entrepreneurshit. The Blog Post on What It’s Really Like.

 

Slide13

Starting a company is a lot of hard work. As Chief Everything Officer, wouldn’t it be nice if you had someone to share with workload and help you cope emotionally as well? (It’s also a lot more fun if you’d doing it with someone you trust).

A startup is simply too much work for one person. 1 + 1′s efforts are honestly more than two. I’ve met solo entrepreneurs and the speed at which they take action is just too slow.

Find someone who can make up for your lack of skills. You’re a sales guy? Find a technical co-founder. If you can’t convince them of your value proposition, then you might have to re-evaluate your selling skills.

Always pick someone you can trust and would want to hang out with even after work. And sign a founders agreement. Too many friendships go sour because of this.

 

Slide14
As a founder you have to balance priorities. Is it the time to go big on sales? Then stop worrying about another feature and start selling like mad. The only goal for a bootstrapping start-up IS TO MAKE MONEY.

If it’s time for you to do sales and meet people, then attend events and sell the shit out of your product. But other times, please focus on building your product, talking to customers and not flirting with girls.

 

Slide15
Stay on the fucking bus – a great read.

“…in the first weeks or years of any worthwhile project, feedback – whether from your own emotions, or from other people – isn’t a reliable indication of how you’re doing. (This shouldn’t be confused with the dodgy dictum that triggering hostile reactions means you must be doing the right thing; it just doesn’t prove you’re doing the wrong one.) The second point concerns the perils of a world that fetishises originality. A hundred self-help books urge you to have the guts to be “different”: the kid who drops out of university to launch a crazy-sounding startup becomes a cultural hero… yet the Helsinki theory suggests that if you pursue originality too vigorously, you’ll never reach it. Sometimes it takes more guts to keep trudging down a pre-trodden path, to the originality beyond. “Stay on the fucking bus”: there are worse fridge-magnet slogans to live by. Just make sure you take it off the fridge when your prudish relatives visit.”

 

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Ryan Carson, the founder of Treehouse, wrote an excellent piece on this topic.

“Entrepreneurs: Don’t listen to the “must be not-for-profit if you want to change the World” bullshit. The folks who figure out how to build a truly profitable and lasting company will be the ones that really change the World.”

Without Microsoft making the kind of money it is today, Bill Gates would have never been able to set up his foundation. Neither would Microsoft employees have been able to do this:

Microsoft Employees Raise Record-Breaking $100 Million for Nonprofits in 2011
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The last point is about building something valuable for the community and doing that through businesses. My favourite entrepreneurs, Anita Roddick (founder of The Body Shop) and Jack Ma (Founder of Alibaba.com and TaoBao.com) are examples of leaders that used the strengths of their products to empower  millions of people.

Roddick built her empire through her controversial marketing practices emphasizing on fair trade, gave opportunities for native people of the Amazon to work and was a strong human rights activist. She pissed a lot of people off in the process and yet, although she was selling something as “trivial” or “fluff” as cosmetics, people heard her voice and started to echo it when The Body Shop became a global company.

 

Former English teacher, Jack Ma, empowered a whole nation of sellers by offering a free platform for small businesses to set up shop on e-commerce platform. It was at a time where eBay was in fierce competition to become a leader of the Chinese market, but didn’t think twice about providing a usable platform for the local people.

http://chinapersonified.com/jack-ma/

 

Check out the slides here:

Creating new habits and inspired by BJ Fogg’s Behaviour Grid

I was introduced to BJ Fogg’s work by an ex-colleague of mine (Kai Lin from 2359 Media), who used to write bite sized introductions to his work on habit design. Fogg leads Stanford’s Persuasive Technology Lab and gives great insight on how simplicity helps people to build new habits.

 

I then stumbled across his talk from Rock Health, which basically gives a great overview into how you can help users create new habits by adapting tiny steps.

If there’s only one thing you do this week, watch this video!

 

 

 

 

Fogg’s Behavior Grid

 

You can also sign up for his Tiny Habits course at http://tinyhabits.com/ to start creating new habits for yourself. I’m starting this week.

Essentially, you form a new habit by shifting your perspective of it and anchoring it to an action you do everyday. It has to be something simple enough to do and can be done in 30s.

Here are mine:

1. After I step into the MRT, I will memorise a Spanish Phrase from my app.

2. After I brush my teeth, I will do 5 situps.

3. After I login to my laptop the first time that day, I will publish a headline for my blog article.

Enjoy his talk!

Must Watch: Creating the minimum badass user by Kathy Sierra

 

I just re-watched this talk by Kathy Sierra about creating the minimum badass user. I know how there are tonnes of videos you can watch to help you create “a better ux”, but this talk just blows my mind. It cuts through all the noise on how you should approach product development and instead re-focuses the creators’ intentions on making products that make their users truly ‘badass’.

She talks about shifting our fundamental premise of getting users to think the app you are creating is cool to inside getting your app to help your users seem cool. Less on your app, more on your user.

It’s a great talk and interesting enough to keep you hooked through the entire sitting. It made me think about why people spend tonnes on money on luxury products or fancy sunglasses (because it makes them look more sophisticated, cooler or ‘badass’).

 

Also reminded me that somethings are counter-intuitive – like how at a sales call, though you are tempted to flood others with your agenda, it’s much more productive to ask them “How can I help grow your business” and align your goals instead of just talking about yours.

 

At the end of it she also talks about the 3 pillars of your product that help your user become experts.

They are:

  1. Give them repeated exposure to examples of what really good looks like. (E.g, for photographers it may be repeatedly letting them look at great photos).
  2. Practice Cognitive-Resource-Driven Design - give them things that they can master in just 1 – 3 sessions.
  3. Provide a roadmap of what it takes to be badass at something -  like in karate where people go through clear progressive stages to become a karate master, it’s essential that your user can see where he’s going with his progress.

In the end, you are creating for your users’ users.

Go forth and be badass!

The 3 types of mentors you need in your life

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Over beer today, Kaiwei told me that “not everyone is as lucky as you to have good mentors.”

 

And then it hit me, that I really am (lucky, that is).

If it’s anything I’ve learnt from being in this startup ecosystem for the last 2 years, it’s that no one succeeds by their own merit. A lot of it has to do with tapping on the networks of others and getting the right kind of help at the right time.

 

Sometimes the help comes in tangible forms, such as money or free office space. Most of the time though, the things that truly matter and stick with you are the intangible stuff – such as connections that lead to closing a deal, job opportunities, much needed life advice  and learning how to be a good leader.

 

Although I didn’t realise it, I’ve deliberately sought for 3 types of mentors in my life.

 

1. Role Model Mentors

Yup, the title is straightforward enough. These are the mentors who you eventually want to be like. The ones you look to and think to yourself, “wow, this is someone I want to be like if I were to be e.g., a manager / activist /mother / whatever I want to be someday.

 

Most of the time they have had much more life experience and you find them working on things that you dream of working on yourself. They’re not easy to find and you probably won’t get much time with them, but just a short amount of time with them is enough to give you an eureka moment. You find them through a networking session, a short cab ride together or even reading their autobiography (especially so if they are already dead).

 

At Microsoft, I’ve had to opportunity to work with great bosses who have shown me what to do right in a team, how to motivate others, bring your vision alive through good execution and managing people’s expectations. If you’re lucky to spend more time with these mentors, you get to experience what it’s like to lead their lives and gives you greater courage to move in that direction.

 

2. Peers who are your mentors

“You are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.” – Jim Rohn

 

Sometimes it doesn’t matter how smart you are. It may not matter how talented you are, or which skills you have, where you are born or which family you came from. All that counts if you want to be successful in life is the people you surround yourself with. For most people, these are your peers, colleagues or family.

 

They are the ones that influence and reinforce your beliefs through their actions and serve as a good reminder to you of what you could be doing with your life. They push you to do the things you want to do now than later. Because you are at a similar stage of life experience, these mentors also have greater empathy for what you’re going through and have memories of lessons learnt fresh in their minds. Then you learn from each other.
I remember what it was like when I first met Gwen. I was fresh out of school and she’d been running SGEntrepreneurs for a couple of years.

 

I was inspired that someone just slightly older than myself is confident enough to step into an industry that is traditionally male dominated and more importantly, learnt to carve her own niche within it. Since then, Gwen has continuously encouraged me to be in a place where I’m constantly learning and given me many opportunities to build my own place in this industry.

 

3. Mentoring those that are seek mentorship

They say that you only realise how much you really know when you have to teach it. That is true when you find others looking to you to learn something from. Sometimes the stress from not wanting to be responsible for others’ failures can be a healthy thing. You tend to re-evaluate the life you’re leading and remind yourself of the good habits that you want to pass to others. It’s this kind of pay-it-forward mentality that will increase the average collective intelligence of the world.

 

In the end, it all comes back to you.

 

 

BizSpark Plus and Windows Azure 60K Offer

One of the best offers on BizSpark Plus is the Windows Azure 60K Offer.

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Windows Azure $60K Offer

Microsoft BizSpark extends special offers to help top startups grow their businesses. These offers are available to startups who are members or alumni of an Accelerator Program.

The Windows Azure $60K Offer helps cover cloud computing costs by providing up to $60K worth of Windows Azure over two years:

  • 100% of Windows Azure usage for the first year
  • 50% off Windows Azure retail for the second year

Through this offer, every dollar startups save on their cloud computing costs means more money for them to spend elsewhere for hiring developers, investing in marketing, acquiring new customers, etc.

How to get the Windows Azure $60K Offer

You must be:

  • A member or alumni of an Accelerator Program
  • Developing Software
  • Less than five years old
  • Privately Held
  • Making less than US $1M annually

 

If you’re a startup already on the BizSpark network, reach out to me a-johua@microsoft.com for more information.

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